ABOUT ROBOFOOD

The new science and technology of edible robots and robotic food for humans and animals

Ordering your pizza and having it delivered in a few minutes by a drone? That could soon be routine. But what about having the drone itself for dessert, instead of sending it back? That would be entirely new technological territory with applications far beyond take-away meals. By combining food science and robotic science in a radically new way, the ROBOFOOD project will for the first time create robots that can be eaten and foods that behave like robots. Such edible robots could deliver lifesaving nutrition to humans in emergency situation; they could supply vaccines and supplements to endangered animal
species; robotic food with edible actuators and electronics, on the other hand, could tell us when it is well preserved and safe to eat; it could protect itself from excessive heat or humidity during storage; it could facilitate swallowing for neurologic patients, and interact with humans and animals in totally new ways, to address dietary goals or influence eating habits. These goals require an interdisciplinary investigation into the principles of robotics and food science, which have very different and contrasting properties. Traditional robots are inorganic systems that perceive the environment and perform actions. Food instead is mostly organic material that can be digested and metabolized to support life. We will use soft robotic principles and advanced food processing methods to establish a common ground, and pave the way towards a new design space for edible robots and robotic food. We will validate it with proof-of-concept technologies for animal preservation, human rescue, human nutrition. The project is profoundly interdisciplinary, merging two fields that have hardly ever interacted before and pushing them well beyond the state of the art.

TEAM

Dario Floreano
Dario Floreano
Laboratory of Intelligent Systems
EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
Coordinator
Remko Boom
Remko Boom
Laboratory of Food Process Engineering
Wageningen University and Research
The Netherlands
Mario Caironi
Mario Caironi
Printed and Molecular Electronics (PME) group
Italian Institute of Technology
Milan, Italy
Jonathan Rossiter
Jonathan Rossiter
Soft Robotics Group
University of Bristol
United Kingdom

RESEARCH

Click on the links below to see a few examples of previous research from our partners on edible robotics and electronic components and advanced food processing.

OPEN POSITIONS

CONTACT

    Collaborations: